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Understanding Your Mental Health

Iyana Jones, Staff Writer

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As far as school goes, I think it’s safe to say that it’s time we all learn how to truly take care of ourselves. No more mommy and daddy picking up after us or chauffeuring us around.

As young adults, we learn what it means to be responsible for ourselves in every way possible while in college. Physically, that means taking care of ourselves. Spatially, making sure we are taking care of the environment we are in. Socially, choosing our friends with no influence by our parents or old peers. But most importantly, mentally.

Mental health is a real issue amongst young adults.People have to learn how to deal with their thoughts and feelings without anyone to turn to because these aren’t typically conversations we know how to have.

“I wish I had been able to have conversations about mental health earlier than high school. I think it would have been beneficial to learn about my feelings and thoughts how to express them appropriately,” said junior Nia Grey.

Often, the conversations about mental health are happening after something is wrong rather than before. The approach should be proactive, not reactive. Television and movies have opened the door for conversation for young adults with hits such as Misfits and 13 Reasons Why. Between just those two shows alone, topics such as depression, bullying, and suicide are explored; all of which are sensitive topics. Even the movie Inside Out, meant for children, explores the how big events can affect young audiences.

“I think that the more we discuss these problems the more people can become aware. After seeing 13 Reasons Why, it hit me that I don’t know much about what can cause someone to be pushed over the edge and now I’m more aware. The show/films are the start to our conversations and because the film industry is so popular to the average person, that is where we can start awareness,” said senior Nicole Kaspryszki.

Counseling and psychological services are available Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., located at the bottom floor of Sheffield Hall, for students who are looking for help.

 

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Understanding Your Mental Health