MENU

Animal Awareness Tip – The Aye Aye

Maideline Sanchez

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Aye Aye is related to the lemur and can be found primarily in the eastern part of Madagascar. This nocturnal animal mostly relies on its rodent-like teeth and elongated middle finger to obtain its food.

The Aye Aye is related to the lemur and can be found primarily in the eastern part of Madagascar.

While it gnaws its teeth through wood, it also uses its specialized finger to dig into the penetrated area of the wood to capture grubs.

The Aye-Aye is considered an omnivorous creature that eats fruits, nuts, seeds, fungi, nectar, and even grubs. When food is scarce around its natural habitat they usually steal from nearby villages. When looking for grubs, they use their long middle fingers to tap on the wood several times per second. The intensity of the sound or the echo that is produced from the hallow chambers inside the wood determines the presence of grubs.

Like other prosimians (primates other than apes and monkeys), females are the dominant sex and are often territorial. Researchers found that male home territories overlap with each other and are very social amongst each other aye ayes; female territories are much smaller and never overlap with that of other females. Males are polygamous and tend to become very aggressive when competing for other females; they can be seen pulling other males off of females when mating. When a female is pregnant, they will remain in close proximity with her mate until the baby is born and has matured. The infant’s primary source of interaction is with their mothers. For playtime, they often wrestle, chase, and even play “peek-a-boo”. After 13 weeks of age the infants will become independent and play with others of their own kind.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Student News Source of the University of New Haven
Animal Awareness Tip – The Aye Aye