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The Charger Bulletin

University Adopts Print Green Program Across Campus

Zack Rosen

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By now you’ve certainly heard about the controversial new Print Green, aka “Pay-to-Print” program that will be implemented on campus soon. Last week, The Charger Bulletin’s Editor-in-Chief Zack Rosen had the opportunity to meet with Associate Vice President for Information Technology & CIO of the University of New Haven Vin Mangiacapra and Director of Academic Computing Alan MacDougall.

Class of 2012 Electrical Engineering major and USGA Senator Josh Van Hoesen jokingly places a fake debit card through the card swipe at the Marvin K. Peterson Library print station, emphasizing that students may need to start paying to print, after students were informed of a printing program which will charge students a fee after using up given credits. The new Print Green, aka Pay-to-Print, program will be started Nov. 9, 2009.

Class of 2012 Electrical Engineering major and USGA Senator Josh Van Hoesen jokingly places a fake debit card through the card swipe at the Marvin K. Peterson Library print station, emphasizing that students may need to start paying to print, after students were informed of a printing program which will charge students a fee after using up given credits. The new Print Green, aka Pay-to-Print, program will be started Nov. 9, 2009.

During the past few years especially, the waste of paper has become an apparent problem across campus. Mangiacapra estimates that paper costs per year exceed $75,000 to $100,000. This money, according to Mangiacapra, can be better utilized to benefit the campus.

To help lower this waste of paper, the university will be implementing the Print Green program to begin on Nov. 9, 2009. Undergraduate students will be given 225 printing credits per semester (equivalent to $18.00), and graduate students will be given 150 credits per trimester. If a student uses more than these 225 credits, an additional eight cents will be charged per sheet for black and white (including duplex), and an additional 50 cents per sheet will be charged for color. These 225 credits, which will be refreshed prior to the start of the undergraduate and graduate terms, will not be rolled over for each semester.

Printing charges will occur in the library, as well as all public computer labs. Although this includes the engineering printers in Buckman and the graphic arts printers in Dodds, these fees are being worked out for students using these services for class-related printing.

Faculty and staff who use these public printers, as of now, will also be required to swipe their UNH IDs. “We will be monitoring the new print management program very closely over the next year,” says Mangiacapra, “and will examine ways to make enhancements if needed.”

To begin enhancing printing on campus, the university will be adding a new color printer in the library.

According to Director of Academic Computing Alan MacDougall, another technological advancement on campus includes a new Ad-Value machine in the library. This new machine, which allows students to put money on their student IDs, will be able to utilize credit cards as well as cash.

Students around campus still have mixed reviews about this new program.

“I don’t really think that this is a case of green awareness…this is a case of extortion and money,” says Class of 2011 Criminal Justice student Carole McFaddan. Most were against it at first but once the USGA and The Charger Bulletin got involved, the 225 credits per semester was worked out. While reviews are still somewhat mixed, many are happy with this solution. It is without a doubt that paper is being wasted at a disgusting level, and many agree that the university needs to be doing something.

According to Class of 2013 Music Industry student Doug Valeri, “the pay to print allows everyone to benefit; I wouldn’t want to see someone printing out a 30-page book when I’m just trying to print a two-page paper. [It] also allows people to be more economically and environmentally aware.” To which Class of 2012 Criminal Justice student Ross Olivier echoes Valeri’s statement, saying that “people abuse it [printing], so why not set a page limit on what we can print?”

But according to many, it’s actually the professors and deans on campus who need to control their paper use, or stop requiring students to print multiple papers instead of electronically submitting and viewing them.

One UNH employee, who wishes to remain anonymous, made a very good point. “We didn’t read Greasy Rider to then have them handing in printed papers.” If this program is done right, it will be a huge benefit to the campus community.

If it’s done wrong, over 1,200 students will have read Greasy Rider for no reason.

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The Student News Source of the University of New Haven
University Adopts Print Green Program Across Campus