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Kick-Ass: Wannabe Superheroes

Tom Chieppo

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Ever dream about being invisible to girls and being scared to ask out the girl of your dreams? Dave Lizewski (Aaron Johnson) wanted to know what it would be like to be a superhero and be the boyfriend of Katie Deauxma (Lyndsy Fonseca). Johnson was tired of being a reject and couldn’t stand being picked on by bullies anymore. Unlike most young teenagers, Johnson took a different approach to his lofty dreams: he created the superhero and dual identity Kick-Ass.

FILE - In this April 13, 2010 file photo, Nicolas Cage, left, and Aaron Johnson pose together at the premiere of the film "Kick-Ass" in Los Angeles. It's another photo finish at the weekend box office, with the No. 1 spot too close to call between the animated adventure "How to Train Your Dragon" and the superhero comedy "Kick-Ass." Distributor Paramount reported Sunday that DreamWorks Animation's "How to Train Your Dragon" took in $20 million, while "Kick-Ass" distributor Lionsgate reported its movie debuting just behind at $19.75 million. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)

In the film, Kick-Ass runs into two more superheroes: Hit-girl (Chloe Moretz) and Big Daddy (Nicolas Cage); modern day versions of Batman and Batgirl. Both were on a mission to stop the Russian Mafia from killing innocent people. The leader of the Russian Mafia Frank D’Amico (Mark Strong) wanted to expose Kick-Ass and Big Daddy. Check out Kick-Ass for the surprise ending showdown between the superheroes and their arch nemesis.

Another wannabe hero in Kick-Ass was the son of Frank D’Amico, Chris D’Amico (Christopher Mintz Plasse), known as Red Mist. Red Mist, just like Kick-Ass wanted attention from his father and his classmates at high school. The two join forces to bring down the Russian mafia throughout the film.

Matthew Vaughn, Director of Kick-Ass, also directed Stardust and Layer Cake. Vaughn showed in this film that you don’t have to be a superhero with powers to make a difference: change comes from within the heart of an individual. Vaughn showed the audience that anyone can make a difference in life and heroism is not created by flashy costumes and nicknames.

However, the movie could be considered inappropriate, as it showcases young children with hand guns killing members of the Russian Mafia. I thought it also ripped off Batman and Spiderman; Kick-Ass was a little too carbon-copy of other superhero movies.

If you’re looking for another violent superhero movie to see and perhaps you want to become your own superhero, then I suggest you see the movie Kick-Ass. I give the movie 3 out of 5 stars because it was gruesome and a pure copy cat of much better superhero films. This was a movie without superhero powers, but still relatively enjoyable to the typical movie-goer. Kick-Ass wasn’t so kick ass, so wait for it to come out on DVD!

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Kick-Ass: Wannabe Superheroes